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HYPHENATED IDENTITIES AND IN-BETWEEN SPACES: FERRYING FROM   GLOBAL SOUTH TO GLOBAL NORTH

Prabuddha Mukherjee

Research Scholar (Ph.D.)

Department of English

Ravenshaw University, Cuttack, Odisha, India

prabuddhamukherjee123@gmail.com

Abstract:

The Caribbean people when positioned on a double-diasporic platform could best consider literature as a strong medium to convey their experiences and articulate their ideas to the readers of perhaps every vein of the society as “Literature is the expression of a feeling of deprivation, recourse against a sense of something missing”, observes Octavia Paz (172). Taking into consideration the fact that The Caribbean Islands eventually ended up being a colony of the British, the earliest migration of an assortment of ethnic groups corroborated to be a forced one. These groups under the influence of British culture and socialization adapted to English language despite the maturity and implication of a Creole culture after decolonization. The post-colonial environment planted identity consciousness in them. But, the political state of affairs then in the islands proscribed individual ethnic groups that had already failed to retain their root identities, to intermingle and acknowledge their new reflexively shaped identity of the Caribbean. The migration to Canada from 1965 onwards was premeditated as the youth primarily migrated to study and obtain exposure in the North. This led to a deliberate attempt to recreate their identity as “Caribbeans” rather than hyphenated Indo-Caribbean, Afro-Caribbean, etc. Owing to British authority and their Missionaries, the Caribbean individuals were well-read and their existence could not be starved off. They successfully left their footprints in almost every potential meadow in Canada and were progressively acknowledged by the Whites even when skin colour proved to be a barrier. Considering these aspects as the background, this paper will try to explore

  • how these double-diasporic people tried to recreate their Caribbean culture and identity in Canada
  • how authors like Cyril Dabydeen have expressed the notions of ‘self’ in their writings
  • how eventually their writings have become a part of mainstream English studies and helped in deconstruction of English

journal of english

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2017-11-29T11:51:53+00:00
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