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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

        LINGUISTIC OPEN-ENDEDNESS IN CAMEROONIAN POPULAR DRAMA  

WANCHIA T. NEBA

PHD

ADVANCED SCHOOL OF TRANSLATORS AND INTERPRETERS (ASTI), UNIVERSITY OF BUEA- CAMEROON

 

 

Abstract

This study set out to describe the major features of linguistic open-endedness in Cameroonian popular drama. Drawing examples from some Cameroonian comedians such as Dave K. Moktoï, linguistic open-endedness was described at three levels viz the word level, the sentence level and the text level. Using the DTS model, these traits were analysed against a backdrop of the socio-cultural and linguistic contexts out of which they were born. The findings reveal that linguistic open-endedness is characterised by neologisms and agrammaticalities.

Key words: drama, popular theatre, linguistic open-endedness

  1. Introduction

This study seeks to describe features of linguistic open-endedness in Cameroonian popular drama at the word level, the sentence level and the text level. The study will begin by shedding light on some key concepts before delving straight into the traits of linguistic open-endedness, categorising while explaining with examples. Some recommendations will be made at the end of the presentation of the findings.

  1. Conceptual framework

The key concepts that underpin thus work include (drama, popular theatre and linguistic open-endedness) are defined below.

Drama: Drama is one of literature’s three genres, the others being poetry and prose. Modern scholarship has provided several definitions for traditional/conventional/mainstream drama. The Webster’s Deluxe Unabridged Dictionary (1983:553) says drama “is a literary composition that tells a story, usually of human conflict, by means of dialogue and action, to be performed on stage by actors”. The Encyclopaedia Britannica (1768:627) views drama as a form of “art in which the artist imagines a story concerning persons and incidents, without himself describing, narrating or explaining what is happening”.  The World Book Encyclopaedia (1994:284) says drama is “an art form that tells a story through the speech and actions of characters in the story”. From these definitions, one gathers that drama is generally an art form that enacts human life in speech and action through characters. In more concrete scholarly literary terms, the following complementary definitions have been proposed.

journal of english

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2017-07-29T10:10:41+00:00
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