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MARRIAGES OF SOULS AND SECULARISM: KARANJIA’S MORE OF AN INDIAN AND FIRDOUS KANGA’S TRYING TO GROW

DR. RAM LALIT

(PGT ENGLISH)

KENDRIYA VIDYALAYA SANGATHAN

EMAIL ID: RAMLALIT102@GMAIL.COM

 

 

 

Abstract:

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognized union or legal contract between the spouses. However, in India, marriage is often confined to caste, creed and religion. But if we talk about marriage of souls and secularism, it transcends all aforesaid obligations and impediments. This paper will try to analyze marriages of souls and secularism in Karanjia’s More of an Indian and Firdous Kanga’s Trying to Grow. Both novelists belong to Parsi community which is known for adhering strict form of tradition, rituals and ceremonies. The dilemma of the Parsis is to remain attached to their own religion, tradition and marriages or to adopt western way of living.   Marriage is dealt in both novels as an ‘idea’ as well as real-life experience. In Karanjia’s More of an Indian, the conflict of mixed marriage is portrayed through the hardships of Shirin—a Westernized Parsi girl and Ashok—a Hindu boy – and Dolly a Westernized Parsi girl who falls in love with a Muslim boy, a doctor in America.  The Parsi writers meticulously observe and convey the transition period through which the Parsi community is passing. Firdous Kanga too deals with mixed marriage. But he is not as much open as Karanjia. His characters appreciate love marriages. But he presents it as an obligation. Going through the novels of Rohinton Mistry, B.K. Karanjia and Firdous Kanga, we can learn about Parsi marriage, their secular and traditional attitude and the reason of their dwindling from this planet.

Key Words:  Marriage, Community, Emancipation, Dilemma, Universality.

journal of english

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2017-08-01T09:06:45+00:00
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