This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

  A  NEW METHOD FOR TEACHING ENGLISH GRAMMAR  

Shelton A. Wijesinghe – Sri Lanka

 

English grammar, in the course of its evolution from the Anglo-Saxon precursor days to become a world language, has been rendered simple, and the object of this paper is to further simplify its understanding, given that it is currently the most sought after language for learning.

 

1.0   Introduction

 

1.1 English became a world language on its own merits assisted by simplified grammar. This spectacular achievement, many attribute to colonial rule that brought nearly a quarter of the globe under British domination, where English was the language imposed, Imperium Britannium, and the imposition served as a vehicle for disseminating it.   However, cross-border penetration and extensive use of a language alone are not criteria for making a language acquire a world language status. If so, Latin, the counterpart of English under the Roman Empire, should be the world language of today, and not English, given that the Roman Empire straddling the whole of Europe and the fairest part of Africa and Asia provided Latin with the widest usage imaginable, and for duration unmatchable – the British Empire about 150 years, a minuscule, compared to around 500 years that spanned the Roman Empire. But with the collapse of the Roman Empire, Latin got relegated to a classical language status: discarded in the very country, Italy, which begot it. In contrast, notwithstanding the disintegration of the British Empire, a fait accompli by the 60s, English is forging ahead with more and more non-native tongues using to it. The other two colonial powers of the same era as Britain were France and Spain;  France  more aggressively than Spain,

Page 02

vied for the world language status, but the grammar of this Romance language, burdened with the complications of Latin thwarted the French aspiration.journal of english

Share
2017-09-11T11:33:07+00:00
Share