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Subaltern vision of Shakespeare in The Tempest

*Pabitra Bharali.

Assistant Professor,

Department of English,

Digboi College, Digboi. Assam, India.

Mobile no: 9435003400

e-mail: pabitrabharali@yahoo.com

 

**Ananya Dash.

Research Scholar,

Department of English,

Nagaland University. Nagaland, India.

 

 

 

Abstract

The concept of subalternity as a complex socio-political-cultural construct has gained immense popularity since the late 20th century and has been one of the major dimensions of postcolonial cultural and critical discourses. While subscribing to Gramscian conceptualization, it points to colonial hegemonic domination on the one hand and tends to interrogate traditional historiography and colonialist elitism on the other.  Although Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak in her seminal essay Can the Subaltern Speak? characterized the subaltern as  ‘voiceless’, subaltern consciousness prompted by the postcolonial ‘spirit of resistance’ and desire for upward mobility remains a predominant feature of the subaltern group championed by Ranajit Guha. Any discourse on subalternity as such is engagingly concerned with interpretation of subaltern consciousness whether based on colonial experience or race and ethnicity or caste and class or language and culture. Colonial situations provide a fertile ground for deliberation upon subaltern consciousness. The Tempest (1610) with its apt framework of a colonial situation provides a powerful avenue for exploring the subaltern consciousness of Shakespeare through an indepth analysis of its characters. The native Caliban’s relationship to the colonial master Prospero is a brilliant instance of colonial subalternity, whereas Ariel, Miranda, Antonio, Alonso and Sebastian point to the diverse dimensions of power and exercise of power upon the powerless  and gender subaltern. The present paper in an interpretative approach attempts to explore Shakespeare’s subaltern vision as depicted in his last play The Tempest.

Key words: Colonial domination, hegemony, power, resistance, subaltern, The Tempest.

journal of english

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2017-11-30T06:09:31+00:00
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