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The Ottoman Istanbul Culture of Ambivalence in Orhan Pamuk’s Novel, The White Castle

Nasir Faried Butt

Ph.D. Scholar

Department of English

Central Univeersity of Jammu

Bagla, Jammu, J&K (181143)

email: nasirbutt010@gmail.com

 

 

Abstract:

This paper focuses on Orhan Pamuk’s novel, The White Castle, exploring the tropes of ‘ambivalence’ in the East-West discourse in Turkish culture. The paper analyses the novel against the backdrop of the East-West discourse drawing on Bhabha’s concept of mimicry, liminality and ambivalence. The novel, which is in the form of a centuries old manuscript of Ottoman Turkey proves helpful in understanding the clash of European and Ottoman culture and the result emanating therefrom. The novel also sheds light on the how Pamuk draws a contrast and comparison of the late Twentieth Century Istanbul with that of the Seventeenth Century Anatolia tracking the roots of the East-West relationship through centuries. The paper therefore discusses in detail the effect of the complex relationship between the Anatolian and the European cultures. It discusses the love and hatred between Turkish and the Western cultures that has been prevalent in the region since ages, the resultant of which is deducted in this paper as “ambivalence” in the Turkish culture and identity.

journal of english

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2017-11-27T08:33:37+00:00
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