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THEME OF  FREEDOM, LOVE AND GOODNESS IN IRIS MURDOCH’S FICTION  

NEELAM

PH.D. SCHOLAR, DEPT. OF ENGLISH

KURUKSHETRA UNIVERSITY, KURUKSHETRA

NEELAMBERWAL86@GMAIL.COM

 

 

Abstract

Iris Murdoch, being a philosopher, moralist and thinker, propounds her theory of human personality. She believes that freedom and goodness plays an important role in the making of human personality. Apart from the emphasis on freedom and goodness, her philosophical ideas about love are also a chief ingredient of her philosophy in which theory of personality and character always remain under special focus. Murdoch’s freedom is linked with love.

Iris Murdoch was born of Anglo-Irish parents, Wills John Hughes and Irene Alice, in Dublin (Ireland) on July 15, 1919. Murdoch grew up in London, but she frequently visited Ireland during holidays. Her Anglo-Irish background has given her a distinct sense of bi-national identity which is reflected through her fictional landscape. She was educated at the Froebel Educational Institute, London, then at Badminton School, Bristol and later on at the Somer Ville College, Oxford, where she earned first class honours in classics, ancient history and philosophy in 1942. Her education was influenced by the war and the same influence was seen in her service too when she served as an Assistant Principal in the treasury, London from 1942 to 1944. She was also appointed as an administrative officer in the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, aiding refugees in London, Belgium and Australia from 1944 to 1946. She subsequently returned to Oxford to study philosophy and became a fellow of St. Anne’s College and then she worked as Lecturer in philosophy at Oxford University from 1948 to 1963. She got married, John Bayley, who was a novelist, poet, literary critic and fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1956. She worked as Lecturer at the Royal College of Arts from 1963 to 1967.

journal of english

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2017-08-02T08:26:07+00:00
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