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“WHAT WILL SURVIVE OF US IS LOVE”: PHILIP LARKIN

Dr. IRAM SIDDIQUI

303-III Block, Ohad Residency,

Dodhpur, Civil Lines

ALIGARH-202001, U.P. INDIA

 

 

              Abstract

 

The final poem in Larkin’s celebrated volume, The Whitsun Weddings, “An Arundel Tomb” has been much admired.  The final statement, “What will survive of us is love,” is one of the most famous and discussed lines of Philip Larkin.  “An Arundel Tomb” is one of the very few poems in the Larkin’s canon in conjuring up a melancholic atmosphere in the most of the body of the poem, as is generally expected in any Larkin poem, but ending up ‘almost’ affirmatively.  The present paper deals with the rueful expression of doubt about the conclusion to which it points.  The fascination the poem exerts perhaps lies in the tension between these two opposing tendencies: the bold attempt to immortalize the love of the two figures on the tomb, and the half retreat from that affirmation in the form of equivocation.  The poem, as expected of Larkin, does not land us, when we finish it, in a dark quagmire of pathos or pessimism but shows us a dawn of bird songs, hazy though it is.

journal of english

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2017-11-28T11:40:48+00:00
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