Language Learning: From Colonial to Global

Authors

  • Dr. Kamaljeet Sinha

Abstract

Abstract

Language has power which provides the terms by which reality may be constituted, the names by which the word may be ‘known’. The system of valued it conveys - the suppositions on which it appears to be based, the concepts of geography and history it articulates, the attitudes to difference inscribed in its words, the myriad gradations of distinction encompassed by its lexicon and grammar becomes the system upon which social, economic and political discourse is grounded. Like, most of the battles fought over language in global theory stem from a confusion between language as a communicative tool and language as a cultural symbol. As colonial languages were the vehicles of such a pervasive and intrusive cultural control that it was almost inevitable that many people in global societies assumed that language itself was inherently the key to that control. The crucial function of language is now a medium of power that demands the language as the centre and re-placing it in a discourse fully adapted to the colonized place. The article focused on what colonized people do with language, and to understand how and why language works in global writing, particularly, to understand the remarkable transformation of English literature from postcolonised societies.

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Published

17-05-2017

How to Cite

Sinha, D. . K. . (2017). Language Learning: From Colonial to Global. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH. Retrieved from https://www.ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/242